Today we stopped at Uluru, Australia's very own big rock. It was a magnificent sight, at first popping out above the horizon over the trees and then towering high above us. It was unexpected after our long journey to get here.

Dear Adventurous Reader,

Today we went down to Uluru, Australia's very own big rock. It was a magnificent sight, at first popping out above the horizon over the trees and then towering high above us. It was unexpected after our long journey to get here.

Camped out

We are camped at Uluru Camping Resort, the gums are magnificent and the grass is dotted with red sand. The wildlife has made its home close by and we are enjoying the swimming pool. There is an excellent camp kitchen and showers that have heated water. We have paid and also got an extra night, I am enjoying being setup for more than a single night.

Can we go home now?

Voices echoed from the boys at the foot of Australia's great monument, Uluru. "I'm bored." "I'm hot." "I want to go back now!". There is a myriad of terms that they spoke, all trying to find a way back to the swimming pool at our camping ground.

The boys had a point. It was on the way up to 41 degrees celcius and the monument is just a big rock in the middle of Australia. Kids don't find awe in the things that older people do, but part of me is intent on forcing them to enjoy what they are seeing - or at least wait until the memory is burned in their brains.

We have tracked from the south. A long journey fighting against overheating car to be where we are. We should just stay a little longer and enjoy the view.

The boys realise the significance of the land we are on. At this moment, fighting flies, the heat and the blistering sun they are choosing their significant moment to retreat.

We stay just a little longer, in the heat. Watch the big, red rock sit in the sun and then go to the cultural centre.

Sunrise

I watched the sunrise over the burnt earth and saltbush trees that cover the ground between the horizon and Uluru.

The sun hung below the horizon, taunting the sky just a moment longer before rising. The yellow reflection of the rays and the bright circle of the sun rose slowly above the edge of the earth.

I tools some photos. They don't capture the moment, but they define the memory.

Three Night Before The Rock

We stay for three nights at the camp ground. On the third day it almost rained; some water fell from the sky, but not enough to be called rain.

The boys explored some cultural dances and learn about boomerangs and spears. They came back to camp holding their new boomerangs, big smiles on their faces. Joash got to painting his very quickly and the others followed.

They enjoyed the afternoon throwing boomerangs in the open spaces near the shared kitchen. Adeline enjoyed the dust, playing in it every opportunity she got.

It wasn't so hot the next few days. We took that as a good sign and went on a walking tour to learn about the Mala people.

Leaving

We drove away, watching the national monument disappear behind the desert dunes.

It was a hard trek to see Uluru. The road was long and hot, the journey was tiresome and after all of the problems we still got to see it. I guess that is the way it should be sometimes, if it is too easy you have missed the experience.